Medieval girl names

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Medieval girl names starting with A

Aigul – Kazakh and Kyrgyz form of AYGUL

Amice – Medieval name derived from Latin amicus meaning ‘friend’. This was a popular name in the Middle Ages, though it has since become uncommon

Austeja – Means ‘to weave’ in Lithuanian. This was the name of the Lithuanian goddess of bees

Aygul – Azerbaijani and Uyghur form of AYGUL

Aygun – Derived from the Turkic elements ay ‘moon’ and gun ‘sun’

Aylin – Means ‘of the moon’ in Turkish and Azerbaijani, from Turkic ay ‘moon’

Aynur – Means ‘moon light’ in Turkish, Azerbaijani, Kazakh and Uyghur, ultimately from Turkic ay meaning ‘moon’ and Arabic (nur) meaning ‘light’

Aysel – Means ‘moon flood’ in Turkish and Azerbaijani, from Turkic ay ‘moon’ and sel ‘flood, stream’

Aysu – Derived from Turkish ay meaning ‘moon’ and su meaning ‘water’

Aytac – Derived from Turkish ay meaning ‘moon’ and tac meaning ‘crown’ (of Persian origin)

Ayten – Derived from Turkish ay meaning ‘moon’ and ten meaning ‘skin’ (of Persian origin)

Medieval girl names starting with B

Baila – Variant of BEYLE

Begum – From a royal title, a feminine form of the Turkic beg meaning ‘chieftain’ (modern Turkish bey)

Bela – Derived from the old Slavic word белъ (belu) meaning ‘white’

Belphoebe – Combination of belle ‘beautiful’ and the name PHOEBE. This name was first used by Edmund Spenser in his poem ‘The Faerie Queene’ (1590)

Beyle – From a Slavic word meaning ‘white’

Beylke – Diminutive of BEYLE. This is the name of a daughter of Tevye in late 19th-century Yiddish stories by Sholem Aleichem, on which the musical ‘Fiddler on the Roof’ was based

Biljana – Meaning uncertain, possibly derived from the South Slavic word биље (bilje) meaning ‘herb’

Bilyana – Bulgarian form of BILJANA

Blaga – Feminine form of BLAGOY

Blagica – Derived from South Slavic благ (blag) meaning ‘sweet, pleasant, good’

Blaguna – Feminine form of BLAGUN

Blazena – Derived from Czech and Slovak blazeny meaning ‘blissful, happy’

Blazenka – Croatian feminine form of BLAZ

Bogdana – Feminine form of BOGDAN

Bogna – Polish feminine form of BOGDAN

Bogumila – Feminine form of BOGUMIL

Boguslawa – Feminine form of BOGUSLAW

Bohdana – Czech feminine form of BOGDAN

Bohumila – Czech feminine form of BOGUMIL

Bohuslava – Feminine form of BOHUSLAV

Bojana – Feminine form of BOJAN

Boleslava – Czech and Russian feminine form of BOLESLAW

Boleslawa – Feminine form of BOLESLAW

Bonnie – Means ‘pretty’ from the Scottish word bonnie, which was itself derived from Middle French bon ‘good’. It has been in use as an American given name since the 19th century, and it became especially popular after the movie ‘Gone with the Wind’ (1939), in which it was the nickname of Scarlett’s daughter

Borislava – Feminine form of BORISLAV

Borna – Derived from the Slavic element borti meaning ‘fight, battle’

Boyana – Bulgarian form of BOJANA

Boyka – Feminine form of BOYKO

Bozena – Derived from the Slavic element bozy meaning ‘divine’

Bozhena – Medieval Slavic form of BOZENA

Bozhidara – Bulgarian feminine form of BOZIDAR

Bozica – Diminutive of BOZENA. It also means ‘goddess’ in Croatian

Bozidarka – Feminine form of BOZIDAR

Branimira – Feminine form of BRANIMIR

Branislava – Feminine form of BRANISLAV

Branka – Slovak diminutive of BRANISLAVA

Brankica – Feminine diminutive of BRANKO

Bratislava – Feminine form of BRATISLAV. This is the name of the capital city of Slovakia, though it is unrelated

Bronislava – Czech, Slovak and Russian feminine form of BRONISLAW

Bronislawa – Feminine form of BRONISLAW

Medieval girl names starting with C

Cansu – From Turkish can meaning ‘soul, life’ and su meaning ‘water’

Charna – From a Slavic word meaning ‘black’

Cveta – Serbian form of CVETKA

Cvetka – Derived from Slovene cvet meaning ‘blossom, flower’

Cvijeta – Croatian and Serbian form of CVETKA

Cvita – Croatian form of CVETKA

Czeslawa – Feminine form of CZESLAW

Medieval girl names starting with D

Daina – Means ‘song’ in Lithuanian and Latvian

Dalia – Means ‘fate, luck’ in Lithuanian. This was the name of the Lithuanian goddess of weaving, fate and childbirth, often associated with Laima

Daliborka – Feminine form of DALIBOR

Dana – Short form of BOGDANA, YORDANA or GORDANA

Danica – From a Slavic word meaning ‘morning star, Venus’. This name occurs in Slavic folklore as a personification of the morning star. It has sometimes been used in the English-speaking world since the 1970s

Danika – Variant of DANICA

Darina – Derived from the Slavic word dar meaning ‘gift’. It can also be used as a diminutive of DARIA

Darinka – Either a diminutive of DARIJA, or a derivative of the Slavic word dar meaning ‘gift’

Denica – Bulgarian form and Macedonian variant of DANICA

Desislava – Feminine form of DESISLAV

Dessislava – Alternate transcription of Bulgarian Десислава (see DESISLAVA)

Divna – From Serbian диван (divan) or Macedonian дивен (diven) meaning ‘wonderful’

Dobromila – Polish feminine form of DOBROMIL

Dobroslava – Feminine form of DOBROSLAV

Dobroslawa – Polish feminine form of DOBROSLAV

Domante – Feminine form of DOMANTAS

Doubravka – Czech feminine form of DUBRAVKO

Draga – Feminine form of DRAGO

Dragana – Feminine form of DRAGAN

Dragica – Derived from the Slavic element dragu meaning ‘precious’

Dragoslava – Feminine form of DRAGOSLAV

Draha – Diminutive of DRAHOMIRA

Drahomira – Czech and Slovak feminine form of DRAGOMIR

Drahoslava – Czech and Slovak feminine form of DRAGOSLAV

Drahuse – Diminutive of DRAHOMIRA

Drazenka – Feminine form of DRAZEN

Dubravka – Feminine form of DUBRAVKO

Dusana – Feminine form of DUSAN

Dusanka – Feminine form of DUSAN

Dusica – Feminine diminutive of DUSAN

Dzvezda – Means ‘star’ in Macedonian

Medieval girl names starting with E

Eimante – Feminine form of EIMANTAS

Esmae – Feminine form of ESME

Esme – Means ‘esteemed’ or ‘loved’ in Old French. It was first recorded in Scotland, being borne by the first Duke of Lennox in the 16th century. It is now more common as a feminine name

Esmee – Feminine form of ESME

Medieval girl names starting with G

Gabija – Probably from Lithuanian gaubti meaning ‘to cover’. In Lithuanian mythology this was the name of the goddess of fire and the home

Garnet – From an English surname that either referred to a person who made hinges (Old French carne) or was derived from the Norman name GUARIN

Garnett – Variant of GARNET (2)

Goksu – From Turkish gok meaning ‘sky’ and su meaning ‘water’

Gonul – Means ‘heart’ in Turkish

Goranka – Feminine form of GORAN

Gordana – Feminine form of GORDAN

Gorica – Feminine form of GORAN

Gulay – Means ‘rose moon’ in Turkish

Gunay – Derived from the Turkic elements gun ‘sun’ and ay ‘moon’

Gunel – Derived from the Turkic elements gun ‘sun’ and el ‘country, society’

Guusje – Feminine form of GUUS

Medieval girl names starting with I

Ilkay – Means ‘new moon’ in Turkish, derived from ilk ‘first’ and ay ‘moon’

Ilknur – Means ‘first light’ in Turkish

Ilma – Means ‘air’ in Finnish

Ilmatar – Derived from Finnish ilma ‘air’ combined with a feminine suffix. In Finnish mythology Ilmatar was a semi-androgynous goddess of the heavens. She was the mother of Ilmarinen, Vainamoinen and Lemminkainen

Ilmi – Variant of ILMA (1)

Inna – Meaning unknown. This was the name of an early Scythian saint and martyr, a male, supposedly a disciple of Saint Andrew

Iskra – From a South Slavic word meaning ‘spark’

Iva – Means ‘willow tree’ in South Slavic

Ivka – Diminutive of IVA (1), IVA (2) or IVA (3)

Medieval girl names starting with J

Jaga – Croatian, Serbian and Macedonian diminutive of AGATHA or JAGODA

Jagoda – Means ‘strawberry’ in South Slavic, and ‘berry’ in Polish. Also in Poland, this can be a diminutive of JADWIGA

Jarka – Diminutive of JAROSLAVA or JAROMIRA

Jarmila – Feminine form of JARMIL

Jaromira – Feminine form of JAROMIR

Jaroslava – Czech and Slovak feminine form of JAROSLAW

Jaroslawa – Feminine form of JAROSLAW

Jaruska – Diminutive of JARMILA or JAROSLAVA

Jasna – Derived from South Slavic jasno meaning ‘clear, sharp’

Medieval girl names starting with K

Kalina – Means ‘viburnum tree’ in Bulgarian, Macedonian and Polish

Kalyna – From the Ukrainian word for a type of shrub, also called the guelder rose (species Viburnum opulus)

Kasimira – Feminine form of KASIMIR

Kazia – Short form of KAZIMIERA

Kazimiera – Feminine form of KAZIMIERZ

Konul – Means ‘heart, soul, desire’ in Azerbaijani

Krasimira – Feminine form of KRASIMIR

Kresimira – Feminine form of KRESIMIR

Kveta – Either a short form of KVETOSLAVA or directly from Czech kvet ‘flower, blossom’

Kvetoslava – Slovak feminine form of KVETOSLAV

Kvetuse – Diminutive of KVETOSLAVA

Medieval girl names starting with L

Lada – Meaning uncertain. This was the name of a Slavic fertility goddess. It can also be a diminutive of VLADISLAVA or VLADIMIRA

Ladislava – Czech and Slovak feminine form of VLADISLAV

Laima – From Latvian laime and Lithuanian laima, which mean ‘luck, fate’. This was the name of the Latvian and Lithuanian goddess of fate, luck, pregnancy and childbirth. She was the sister of the goddesses Dekla and Karta, who were also associated with fate

Laimute – Lithuanian diminutive of LAIMA

Lauma – Meaning unknown. In Latvian mythology this is the name of a forest spirit sometimes associated with childbirth and weaving

Lechoslawa – Feminine form of LECHOSLAW

Leslawa – Short form of LECHOSLAWA

Lesleigh – Variant of LESLIE

Lesley – Variant of LESLIE

Leslie – From a Scottish surname that was derived from a Scottish place name, probably derived from Gaelic leas celyn meaning ‘garden of holly’. It has been used as a given name since the 19th century. In America it was more common as a feminine name after the 1940s

Lesly – Variant of LESLIE

Lessie – Diminutive of names containing the sound les, such as LESLIE

Libena – Derived from Czech liby meaning ‘pleasant, nice’, from the Slavic element lyuby meaning ‘love’

Libuse – Derived from Czech liby meaning ‘pleasant, nice’, from the Slavic element lyuby meaning ‘love’. In Czech legend Lubuse was the founder of Prague

Lida – Czech diminutive of LUDMILA

Lidmila – Variant of LUDMILA

Liouba – Alternate transcription of Russian Люба (see LYUBA)

Ljuba – From the Slavic element lyuby meaning ‘love’

Ljubena – Macedonian feminine form of LYUBEN

Ljubica – From the Slavic element lyuby meaning ‘love’ combined with a diminutive suffix. It can also come from Serbo-Croatian ljubicica meaning ‘violet’

Ljudmila – Slovene form of LUDMILA

Luba – Alternate transcription of Russian/Ukrainian Люба (see LYUBA)

Lubica – Slovak form of LJUBICA

Ludmila – Means ‘favour of the people’ from the Slavic elements lyudu ‘people’ and milu ‘gracious, dear’. Saint Ludmila was a 10th-century duchess of Bohemia, the grandmother of Saint Vaclav. She was murdered on the orders of her daughter-in-law Drahomira…

Ludmilla – Alternate transcription of Russian/Bulgarian Людмила (see LYUDMILA)

Lyuba – Diminutive of LYUBOV

Lyubochka – Diminutive of LYUBOV

Lyubov – Derived from the Slavic element lyuby meaning ‘love’

Lyudmila – Russian and Bulgarian form of LUDMILA. This was the name of a character in Aleksandr Pushkin’s poem ‘Ruslan and Lyudmila’ (1820)

Lyudmyla – Ukrainian form of LUDMILA

Medieval girl names starting with M

Malina – Means ‘raspberry’ in several Slavic languages

Marzanna – Polish form of MORANA

Mieczyslawa – Feminine form of MIECZYSLAW

Mila – Originally a diminutive of Slavic names containing the element milu ‘gracious, dear’

Milada – Originally a diminutive of Slavic names containing the element milu ‘gracious, dear’. It has become associated with Czech mlady ‘young’

Milana – Feminine form of MILAN

Milanka – Feminine form of MILAN

Milda – Meaning unknown. This was the name of the Lithuanian goddess of love

Milena – Feminine form of MILAN. It began to be used in Italy in honour of Milena Vukotic (1847-1923), mother of Helen of Montenegro, the wife of the Italian king Victor Emmanuel III. In Italy it can also be considered a combination of MARIA and ELENA

Miley – In the case of actress and singer Miley Cyrus (1992-), it is a shortened form of the nickname Smiley, given to her by her father because she often smiled. Although it was not at all common before she brought it to public attention, there are some examples of its use before her time, most likely as a diminutive of MILES

Milica – From the Slavic element milu meaning ‘gracious’. It was originally a diminutive of names that began with that element

Militsa – Medieval Slavic form of MILICA

Miljana – Feminine form of MILAN

Milka – Diminutive of Slavic names containing the element milu ‘gracious, dear’

Miloslava – Feminine form of MILOSLAV

Miluse – Diminutive of names beginning with the Slavic element milu ‘gracious, dear’

Miluska – Diminutive of names beginning with the Slavic element milu ‘gracious, dear’

Mira – Short form of names containing the Slavic element miru meaning ‘peace’ or ‘world’

Mirica – Diminutive of MIRELA or names containing the Slavic element miru meaning ‘peace, world’

Mirka – Diminutive of MIROSLAVA and other names beginning with the Slavic element miru meaning ‘peace’ or ‘world’

Miroslava – Feminine form of MIROSLAV

Miroslawa – Feminine form of MIROSLAW

Miruna – Possibly derived from the Slavic word mir meaning ‘peace’ or Romanian mira meaning ‘to wonder, to astound’

Misa – Serbian diminutive of MIHAILO, MIROSLAV and other names beginning with a similar sound. In Slovenia it is typically feminine

Mladenka – Feminine form of MLADEN

Mokosh – Derived from Slavic mok meaning ‘wet, moist’. Mokosh was a Slavic goddess of weaving, women, water and fertility. She was often depicted as a woman with a large head and long arms

Morana – From a Slavic root meaning ‘death, plague’. In Slavic mythology this was the name of the goddess of winter and death

Myla – Possibly a feminine form of MILES, influenced by similar-sounding names such as Kyla

Mylene – Combination of MARIE and HELENE. It can also be used as a French form of MILENA

Medieval girl names starting with N

Nada – Means ‘hope’ in South Slavic

Nadege – French form of NADEZHDA

Nadejda – Alternate transcription of Russian/Bulgarian Надежда (see NADEZHDA)

Nadezda – Slovak, Serbian and Latvian form of NADEZHDA

Nadezhda – Means ‘hope’ in Slavic

Nadia – Variant of NADYA (1) used in the western world, as well as an alternate transcription of the Slavic name. It began to be used in France in the 19th century. The name received a boost in popularity from the Romanian gymnast Nadia Comaneci (1961-)

Nadica – Diminutive of NADA (2)

Nadine – French elaborated form of NADIA (1)

Nadiya – Diminutive of NADEZHDA, as well as being the modern Ukrainian word meaning ‘hope’

Nadja – German and Slovene form of NADYA (1)

Nadya – Diminutive of NADEZHDA

Nadzeya – Belarusian form of NADEZHDA

Nadzieja – Polish cognate of NADEZHDA, being the modern Polish word meaning ‘hope’

Neda – Short form of NEDELJKA

Nedeljka – Feminine form of NEDELJKO

Nedelka – Macedonian feminine form of NEDELJKO

Nedelya – Means ‘Sunday’ in Bulgarian

Nediljka – Feminine form of NEDELJKO

Nedjeljka – Variant of NEDELJKA

Nedyalka – Bulgarian feminine form of NEDELJKO

Neli – Diminutive of NEDELYA or ANELIYA

Nuray – Means ‘bright moon’ in Turkish, ultimately from Arabic (nur) meaning ‘light’ and Turkic ay meaning ‘moon’

Medieval girl names starting with O

Ognena – Macedonian feminine form of OGNYAN

Ognyana – Feminine form of OGNYAN

Oriana – Possibly derived from Latin aurum ‘gold’ or from its derivatives, Spanish oro or French or. In medieval legend Oriana was the daughter of a king of England who married the knight Amadis

Oriane – French form of ORIANA

Orianne – French form of ORIANA

Medieval girl names starting with P

Paget – From a surname that meant ‘little page’ (see PAIGE)

Paige – From an English surname meaning ‘servant, page’ in Middle English. It is ultimately derived (via Old French and Italian) from Greek (paidion) meaning ‘little boy’

Parker – From an English occupational surname that meant ‘keeper of the park’

Porsche – From the name of the German car company, which was founded by Ferdinand Porsche (1875-1951). His surname is derived from the given name BORIS

Medieval girl names starting with R

Rada – Derived from the Slavic element rad meaning ‘happy, willing’

Radana – Derived from the Slavic element rad meaning ‘happy, willing’

Radka – Feminine form of RADKO

Radmila – Serbian, Croatian and Czech feminine form of RADOMIL

Radomila – Polish feminine form of RADOMIL

Radomira – Czech feminine form of RADOMIR

Radoslava – Feminine form of RADOSLAV

Radoslawa – Feminine form of RADOSLAW

Raina – Alternate transcription of Bulgarian Райна (see RAYNA (1))

Ranka – Feminine form of RANKO

Rasa – Means ‘dew’ in Lithuanian and Latvian

Raya – Diminutive of RAYNA (1) or RAISA (1)

Rayna – Either a Bulgarian form of REGINA or a feminine form of RAYNO

Rosa – Means ‘dew’ in the South Slavic languages

Rosica – Alternate transcription of Bulgarian Росица (see ROSITSA)

Rositsa – Diminutive of ROSA (2)

Medieval girl names starting with S

Saule – Means ‘sun’ in Lithuanian. This was the name of the Lithuanian sun goddess

Saulia – Possible earlier form of SAULE

Sevda – Means ‘love, infatuation’ in Turkish and Azerbaijani

Sevgi – Means ‘love’ in Turkish

Sevil – Means ‘loved’ in Turkish

Sevim – Means ‘love’ in Turkish

Sevinc – Means ‘joy’ in Azerbaijani

Sevinj – Variant of SEVINC

Siwa – Variant of ZIVA

Slava – Short form of Slavic names containing the element slava ‘glory’

Slavena – Derived from Slavic slava meaning ‘glory’

Slavica – Derived from Slavic slava meaning ‘glory’

Slavitsa – Possible medieval Slavic form of SLAVICA

Slavka – Feminine form of SLAVKO

Slawomira – Polish feminine form of SLAWOMIR

Snezana – Serbian form of SNJEZANA

Snezhana – Russian, Bulgarian and Macedonian cognate of SNJEZANA

Snjezana – Derived from the Slavic word snezan meaning ‘snowy’

Sobieslawa – Polish feminine form of SOBIESLAW

Stana – Short form of STANISLAVA and other Slavic names beginning with the element stani meaning ‘stand, become’

Stanislava – Feminine form of STANISLAV

Stanislawa – Feminine form of STANISLAW

Stanka – Feminine diminutive of STANISLAV

Stasya – Diminutive of STANISLAVA or ANASTASIYA

Stoja – Croatian feminine form of STOYAN

Stoyanka – Feminine form of STOYAN

Su – Means ‘water’ in Turkish

Svatava – Derived from the Slavic element svetu meaning ‘blessed, holy’

Medieval girl names starting with T

Tayla – Probably a feminine form of TAYLOR influenced by similar-sounding names such as KAYLA

Tayler – Variant of TAYLOR

Taylor – From an English surname that originally denoted someone who was a tailor, from Norman French tailleur, ultimately from Latin taliare ‘to cut’. Its modern use as a feminine name may have been influenced by the British-American author Taylor Caldwell (1900-1985)

Tihana – Short form of Slavic names beginning with the element tikhu ‘quiet’

Tijana – Variant of TIHANA

Tomislava – Feminine form of TOMISLAV

Tsveta – Feminine form of TSVETAN

Tsvetana – Feminine form of TSVETAN

Tsvetanka – Feminine diminutive of TSVETAN

Tuula – Variant of TUULI

Tuule – Estonian form of TUULI

Tuuli – Means ‘wind’ in Finnish

Medieval girl names starting with V

Vaclava – Czech feminine form of VACLAV

Valda – Feminine form of VALDIS

Veca – Diminutive of VESNA

Vedrana – Feminine form of VEDRAN

Veer – Dutch and Limburgish short form of VERA (1)

Veera – Finnish form of VERA (1)

Veerke – Diminutive of VEER

Venceslava – Feminine form of VENCESLAV

Vendula – Diminutive of VACLAVA

Vera – Means ‘faith’ in Russian, though it is sometimes associated with the Latin word verus ‘true’. It has been in general use in the English-speaking world since the late 19th century

Verica – Serbian and Croatian diminutive of VERA (1)

Veriko – Georgian diminutive of VERA (1)

Verochka – Russian diminutive of VERA (1)

Verusha – Russian diminutive of VERA (1)

Vesela – Derived from South Slavic vesel meaning ‘cheerful’

Vesna – Means ‘messenger’ in Slavic. This was the name of a Slavic spirit associated with the springtime. In many Slavic languages this is now the poetic word for ‘spring’. It has been used as a given name only since the 20th century

Viera – Slovak form of VERA (1)

Vilmante – Feminine form of VILMANTAS

Viltaute – Feminine form of VILTAUTAS

Vilte – Short form of VILTAUTE

Vira – Ukrainian form of VERA (1)

Vjekoslava – Feminine form of VJEKOSLAV

Vjera – Croatian and Serbian cognate of VERA (1)

Vladimira – Czech and Slovak form of VLADIMIRA

Vladislava – Feminine form of VLADISLAV

Vlasta – Short form of names beginning with the Slavic element vlasti ‘rule, sovereignty’ (the descendant word vlast means ‘homeland’ in modern Czech)

Vlastimila – Feminine form of VLASTIMIL

Vlatka – Diminutive of VLADIMIRA

Vyara – Bulgarian form of VERA (1)

Vytaute – Feminine form of VYTAUTAS

Medieval girl names starting with W

Waclawa – Feminine form of WACLAW

Wallis – From a surname that was a variant of WALLACE. Wallis Simpson (1895-1986) was the divorced woman whom Edward VIII married, which forced him to abdicate the British throne

Wera – Polish form of VERA (1) or a short form of WERONIKA

Wladyslawa – Feminine form of WLADYSLAW

Wojciecha – Feminine form of WOJCIECH

Medieval girl names starting with Y

Yaroslava – Russian and Ukrainian feminine form of JAROSLAW

Yildiz – Means ‘star’ in Turkish

Yulduz – Means ‘star’ in Uzbek

Medieval girl names starting with Z

Zarja – Slovene variant of ZORA

Zdena – Czech feminine variant of ZDENKO

Zdenka – Czech feminine form of ZDENKO

Zdislava – Czech feminine form of ZDZISLAW. This name was borne by the 13th-century Czech saint Zdislava Berka

Zdzislawa – Feminine form of ZDZISLAW

Zeljka – Feminine form of ZELJKO

Zhivka – Feminine form of ZHIVKO

Zhuldyz – Means ‘star’ in Kazakh

Ziva – Means ‘living, alive’ in Slavic. This was the name of a Slavic goddess associated with life, fertility and spring

Zivka – Croatian and Serbian feminine form of ZHIVKO

Zlata – Feminine form of ZLATAN

Zlatica – Diminutive of ZLATA

Zlatuse – Diminutive of ZLATA

Zlota – From Polish zloto ‘gold’, used as translation of Yiddish Golda

Zora – From a South and West Slavic word meaning ‘dawn, aurora’

Zorana – Feminine form of ZORAN

Zorica – Serbian, Croatian and Macedonian diminutive of ZORA

Zorka – Diminutive of ZORA

Zselyke – Possibly a Hungarian form of ZELJKA

Zvezdana – Serbian and Slovene form of ZVJEZDANA

Zvjezdana – Derived from Croatian zvijezda meaning ‘star’

Zvonimira – Feminine form of ZVONIMIR